Sam McCool

Episode (61) – How to make your dreams come true


stitcher

Sam McCool is a stand-up comedian, MC, published author, keynote speaker and travel entrepreneur. As a comedian, he’s best known for his performances on the show ‘Australia’s Got Talent’ and his sold-out solo shows at the Sydney Opera House. He’s travelled to over 60 countries, speaks 4 languages, and performed around the world from Bollywood to Hollywood.

On today’s show,

Sam talks about the importance of following your dreams, making them real and achieving what you want in life.

Sam also covers,
• How he quit his corporate job to focus on his passion – comedy
• Why he thinks that an office is a prison
• How doing different characters can give you a slightly different personality
• Success comes from building up your skill set, connecting with people and polishing your abilities
• The person is never what’s on the title; that’s just a fraction of who they really are
• The only way to uncover who the person is – connecting with him or her and learn about his or her passion and interests
• His Life Changing Question is: “What can I do at this given moment to make the most of the rest of my life?”
• Why you should do business that is a pleasure at the same time
• Everybody has their own level of success and should measure themselves by their own expectations
• You never know how big you can get if you don’t remove obstacles for yourself
• The importance of removing other people’s expectations of what you can achieve and being true to yourself
• What is ‘Embracism’ and why it is important
• The more you embrace (remove the) difference, the greater you become
• Important rituals and habits: giving yourself a deadline, allowing yourself space to create, making sure you record quality (replace things with) ideas that come to your mind
• How other people can help you trigger your creativity
• Everything is possible if you open up your mind, connect with people and take risks

 

Tweets

Sam McCool is sharing his Life Changing Question. You can listen here Click To Tweet Are you ready to achieve your dreams? Sam McCool shows how to go for it Click To Tweet What's the feeling when you achieve your dreams for the second time? Sam McCool answers Click To Tweet

Resources Mentioned in this show:

sammccool.com

DVD: Multiple Personality Distorter

Book: Lighten Up

Embracist DVD – Link to follow

Recommended Reading:

Transcription

If just one question could immediately transform the quality of your life or the results of your business, would you want to know what that question was?  Life and business strategist, Kevin Bees, interviews success masters to discover their life-changing questions.  Welcome to the Life-Changing Questions podcast.

 

SAM:

It is my mission, [0:00:21] trying to get [0:00:23] to this podcast by my good friend Kevin Bees, who I have seen rise meteorically from an ambitious young gentleman to a very, an over-achieving old gentleman and my name is Sam McCool.  I’m comedian, MC, a travel specialist, you name it, I’ll do it all.

 

KEVIN:

Ha, ha!  He even does voice-overs.  Welcome to the show, Sam!

 

SAM:

Thank you very much, thank you for having me!  Thank you for listening out there.  Stay tuned to the end because hopefully there’s a few nuggets, a few diamonds lying hidden in the depths of what I am about to say.

 

KEVIN:

100% there.  definitely some diamonds gonna come out of this show and if not, some laughter along the way.  Of course, Sam is a true stand-up comedian.  He’s best known for his comedy performances in the [0:01:03] Australia’s Got Talent and then his sold-out solo show at the Sidney Opera House in Sidney, Australia.  Of course, he’s also a comedy actor, writer, improviser, voice-over artist, event MC and now podcast announcer.  So Sam, really, really great to have you here!

 

SAM:

That’s great.  Great, I’m glad I’ve added some extra things to my CV – podcast announcer, it’s awesome!

 

KEVIN:

Podcast announcer!

 

SAM:

Yes and shows that [0:01:24] not just one show, I must admit.  I bring up that point only for a very specific reason, which you may get to later on, which is about achieving goals and dreams that you once thought possibly impossible, once you’ve achieved them, is it possible to replicate them and do them again and what is the feeling you get doing the second time around?

 

KEVIN:

Hey, let’s talk about that straight away because the way I first met Sam, I was trying to overcome my fear of public speaking; I had a goal to be able to speak in front of an audience and not have that fear.  And so I went to do some stand-up comedy.  Now, not being very funny, that was a very challenging thing for me to do, but of course, along the way, Sam being the accomplished comedian and an MC that he was, he happened to be an MC of one of the gigs that I did and that’s where I got to meet Sam, so Sam, at the time, I know you were doing that part-time because you had a full-time corporate gig, you know, where you work in an office, much like many other people, but now may be describe your lifestyle now.  What are you doing now?  Where have you come to?  What do you spend your time doing?

 

SAM:

Okay, very good question.  First of all, I wouldn’t call it an office, I call it a prison.

 

KEVIN:

[laughs]

 

SAM:

We’re confined to those, well, we’re confined to these space for 8 hours a day in the normal corporate world and really you’re not allowed out, are you, [0:02:31] like a half hour when our lunch breaks, so it’s not that different to prison to be honest with you.  I was doing that 4 days a week at that time and doing comedy on the side as a side job, but I slowly found that I could actually make a better income by focusing on my passion, which was comedy, and not so much on making a living, which was what I was doing 4 days a week.  Now I make that point of 4 days a week because a lot of people were like ‘Oh, my god, you get a 3-day weekend, that’s a dream!’  You know, but actually now I get a 6- or 7-day weekend, in fact, its constant weekend and that is a dream, really, but you know to get those 3-day weekend, you still had to sacrifice 20% of your income to do that and a lot of people aren’t even willing to make that sacrifice, you know, so couldn’t see how people think about the situation.  For me, I was willing to trade off 1-day week work for 20% income reduction in my main job, so I could focus on my passion, which was comedy and eventually that bore fruit.

 

KEVIN:

So Sam, probably give us some example over the last may be 6 months, like where have you been doing your work because I see [0:03:29], which are very inspiring.

 

SAM:

Okay, great.  Well, I just got back from Thailand and Singapore.  I have been working from a beach side hotel today, mainly to prove that concept I said earlier about an office being a prison and you can actually break free of that and work from anywhere.  We live in a time now that literally, you know, as we all know, we got Wi- Fi, pretty much [0:03:48] with third world countries, sometimes I’ve [0:03:50] the Wi-Fi and [0:03:51].  You literally can work from anywhere in the world and in terms of comedy, I mean, in the last sort of 12 months, I did my second shows at the Sydney Opera House.  Last year I did a world tour in [0:04:02] Singapore, Kuala Lumpur, Paris, Rio during the Olympic Games, LA and Vegas.  [0:04:08] also plays it all over the world in it.  For me, Kevin, you mentioned earlier, your challenge was to speak in front of an audience.  And obviously you have been able to overcome that challenge because now you do indirectly, but [0:04:19] very subtle change [laughs] [0:04:23] you just shifted the audience into their own living rooms, didn’t you?  It’s very clever, ah!  Talk about strategy [0:04:30] Kevin.  For me, it was about taking my skill set of being able to make people laugh on a live stage in my own country and then same like I do that in other countries, where English [0:04:38] language, including Mexico City etc. and that’s the, you know, real accomplishment for me.  It’s actually realizing that, you know, I can cross the language barrier, language divide or culture divide and really just take my company global.

KEVIN:

And talking about that, I mean, you introduced yourself as Scottish and you know, actually even before we pressed record on this, you had already done the Kiwi accent and kind of an American accent, so tell us, how does that help having the different accents that you do to really help you connect with people in different audiences and different places?

 

SAM:

That was a very good question, Kevin.  Look lot of people give you advice, be yourself because everybody else is taken.  Well, I don’t believe in it.  I believe, be everyone else, make it better than them at it, keep doing it.  Ha, ha!  You know, I have always had this weird habit of imitating people when I am speaking to them, so we’ve had an Italian from Italy as one of my business partner.  You never hear me speak to him normally.  I have only ever spoken to him like this and last week when I was in Singapore, watching the Grand Prix, I met a couple of [0:05:36] and after 3 days with them, they actually designated me [0:05:42] Scotchman, so I believe if you are going to do it, you go do it like you know 100% [0:05:48] and if you are good at it, people will reward you with whatever [0:05:53] it could just be a bottle of Scotch whisky, it could be a trip to Italy, it could be whatever you want.  Your dreams are out there to chase them, ha, ha!  [0:06:02] you know, if you want motivation expression, I mean, I think doing different characters can give you a slightly different personality.  So when I want to be super confident, I often take on an American accent because you know Americans have a belief that, you know, life is out there, go chase it, make it happen, right?  In Australia, quite often we’re a bit more reserved than that, like you know, that sort of [0:06:20] syndrome, where we don’t want to be seen as head of the group or the class, but I think, you know, and I am rambling here, but that’s kind of part of my philosophy is to just get out there and take it on and make things happen.

 

KEVIN:

Take it on and ramble and so you have gone from your prison cell to the opera house.  You made the point not just once, more than once, you’re sought out on several occasions, and you are making a point about achieving your goals and doing that.  You shared with us just before that you went down to 4 days a week and now clearly you are spending all of your time doing your comedy and it’s a thing that you love.  If there were some tips or advice or some wisdom that you could share with pple, who may be so stuck in their prison cell, what would you give to them to help them achieve or live their dreams?

 

SAM:

Yeah, absolutely.  Nothing happens overnight.  You will see that thing about overnight success.  There’s obviously no such thing.  I think anybody who has achieved any real success can tell you that it’s never been overnight, it’s been a long part slog, so obviously in comedy you start up doing pre-gigs and then you get $50 gigs and the $100 gigs and all of a sudden, if you keep going, pursuing it, developing skills, that open your network, you contact, polishing your ability then you can break through the threshold.  There is always a threshold and quite often the thresholds are mental thresholds, so I still remember, to me it was probably a 6-month strategy to get out of my day job and into the corporate speaking world and to the MC road into the comedy world and make it a full-time living.  So it took me about 6 months.  I had a specific set of plan and set of actions.  Eventually it’s about taking a risk and taking a gamble, you got to minimise that risk and gamble by building up your skill set, your network, your contact and your abilities in the meantime and eventually when you get to that point at the crossroads, we say ‘Okay, I’ll look ahead in my life, what do I want to be, what do I want to do, how do I wanna life to be’ and you look backward, you say, ‘Okay, this is the moment when I can make that choice.  Am I ready to make that choice right now or do I need a bit more time?’

 

KEVIN:

And you said something really important in there, I mean, you said you had to build up your skills, always there’s a skill set [0:08:07] one thing and that it was about the network,  I recognise one skill set there, real admiring you as you have ability to network and connect with people.  If there is something you could share with us about you being a successful networker, what would that be?

 

SAM:

Sure.  It’s generally come naturally to me, but I found that [0:08:26] business development roles etc. I think one of the key beliefs is, you never know who a person is, right?  We all have this thing, say that we are networking a vendor, a business networking vendor or any kind of event, people often meet at business conference, business cards have a title on them.  The person is never what’s on the title.  That’s a fraction of who they are.  That person may be the CEO of some business or they may be the, you know, assistant to the sales director, whatever it is, that person may have other hobbies, interests, contacts, knowledge that you have no idea about.  So the only way to really get to know that is through actually connect with them, make an introduction, talk to them about their passions, their interests and what they actually really enjoy and I really believe in [0:09:07] of 6 degrees of separation.  I  am constantly amazed at how much the world is at 2 degrees of separation and  you know, from me to the Queen of England, there is literally only 2 degrees, from me to whoever, you know, from you to somebody like Donald Trump, it [0:09:22] 2 degrees of separation, which is probably not enough degrees, you may want more, but the point is that you never know who somebody is and who I connected to and how they can possibly help you down the track or how you can help them down the track.  So it’s very important when you are networking not to pre-charge, to be open to all possibilities and you know, to be giving first, you know, to actually be helpful to them because you never know where that karma comes back to you.

 

KEVIN:

You never know who someone’s connected with.  Sam, if you wanted to meet the Queen of England, [0:09:51] introduce you to Aunty Liz any time you like, ha, ha!

 

SAM:

And also, and also Kevin, she does have a [0:09:58] you know, she [0:10:01] I mean, you shouldn’t really just pop in for a cup of tea [0:10:03] anytime you like!

 

KEVIN:

Ha, ha!  that’s right!

 

SAM:

When it’s not a fire.

 

KEVIN:

When it’s not a fire, ha, ha!

 

SAM:

Well, that’s probably a long time ago, wasn’t it?  Aha! I just recalled it, little bit of extra [0:10:14]

 

KEVIN:

It’s still in the memories, that’s for sure.  And so Sam, as you know, the title of the show is life-changing questions and what we would really love to know from you, if there was one question that you’ve asked that’s had the biggest possible impact on your life or may be on the life of the audience and the people [0:10:30] what would that question be?

 

SAM:

Well, Kevin, that’s a good question.  I don’t have one question, I have many questions, but I did notice in your brief [0:10:37] this podcast is about improving people’s quality and also quantity of life.  And I thought that is an interesting question.  [0:10:45] quantity of life, is it just one life or then multiple lives.  Now, I may sound a bit weird, however, many cultures believe in reincarnation of the lives and a lot of our behaviour in this life is based on what might happen in the next life.  Now, if you go on that direction, you know, if you think that we only have one life, then it’s about time we all snapped out of it and tried to living the life that we really want because if you don’t want life [0:11:07] this is your only chance.  If you have multiple lives and you could come back at something else, as I believe in Hinduism and other cultures, then it’s probably good time to actually start doing, you know, some good in the world and actually, you know, set yourself up for the next life, right?  So I think first of all, the question is, quality or quantities of life, I am hoping I can improve your quantities of life by making you come back again.  Also that’s another point actually, I am digressing slightly, but recently I realized as you may know, Kevin, that I have mainly passed away in several different ways from my car accident early this year to my second-degree burns from my face and arms last year to [0:11:43] oxygen scuba diving to all sorts of different things, so it does really make you question about the quality of your life and realizing that its a diminishing asset and unless you really make the most of every moment, you are wasting it.  So I guess the question would be, ‘What can I do this given moment to make the most of the rest of my life?’

 

KEVIN:

Oh, I love that.  ‘What can I do at this given moment to make the most of the rest of my life?’

 

SAM:

I wish I had written that.

 

KEVIN:

Yeah, you just did.

 

 

SAM:

[0:12:12]

 

KEVIN:

It’s recorded.  The transcriber’s typing it right now, ha, ha!

 

SAM:

Excellent.  I hope you have outsourced the transcription because you have to do a lot of time to write all that.

 

KEVIN:

It is and that wonderful lady, Susan, will be very happy to hear that word [0:12:27] her great work right now, so, ha, ha!

 

SAM:

Excellent, excellent, Susan, I will speak slower and punctuate more for your benefit.

 

KEVIN:

Ha, ha, so really powerful question, now.  I recognize the way that you live your life, you’re probably asking yourself that question on a daily basis, so since, you know, you are always very present, you’re doing whatever the thing is, its gonna bring you that that quality of life.

 

SAM:

Yeah, look, I think so.  I think that you also need to take the pressure off yourself.  I don’t think that, I mean, may be some people are very ritualistic about that and they wake up every morning, you know, what am I gonna do today to achieve the.. ah, I’m not like that, but I think that ultimately, I’ll give you an example.  It’s a money versus experience sort of trade-off for me.  I am not a millionaire; a lot of people aspire to be millionaires or billionaires, whatever.  Most of our millionaire friends often look at my lifestyle and say, you know what, you live a better lifestyle than me because it’s for me the money versus time trade-off, it’s the money versus experience trade-off.  It’s not only is about chasing the financial side, of course, you need that, but I also try to [0:13:25] experience [0:13:26] pretty much [0:13:27] world trip.  Part of that was work and part of that was pleasure and I am a big believer of mixing business with pleasure because if your business isn’t pleasure then why the hell are you doing it?

 

KEVIN:

Hmmm.. pretty valid point.  And so you have a millionaire lifestyle, Sam, you travel frequently around the world and though you didn’t mention it before, you are very modest, but the pictures I see are frequently from Bora Bora, Tahiti and luxury islands like that and of course, you’re getting paid to go them to help people laugh.

 

SAM:

Absolutely.  And you know, it’s also a thing of like I say in the comedy world, there’s a lot of people who [0:13:59] what’s an acceptable form of success in their career.  Now, some people may say that it’s headlining a comedy clubs, some people may say that it’s doing a corporate event, some people may say that it’s becoming [0:14:09] some people see it as being on television.  There are different levels of success and everybody has their own level and should measure themselves by their own expectations, but quite often people say, well, you know, all of your [0:14:19] comedian, that’s not [0:14:21] well may be it is, but that side of my career has allowed me to go last year and climb Machu Picchu; it has allowed me to go to the Rio Olympics in Brazil; it’s allowed me to go to Bora Bora on Tahiti several times, that a point I have made earlier about, you know, when you have a once in a lifetime experience, it’s this expression of that, it’s a once in lifetime experience, but actually I have found in my recent years, that a once a lifetime experience can actually be repeated several times in your lifestyle, if you set [0:14:49]correctly.  So I [0:14:50] Tahiti, Bora Bora on the cruise, I pull this one off and now I have been several times, 4 or 5 times and I have actually turned it down a couple of time.  So it’s an interesting thing about thresholds and mental thresholds, you know, in the way we set our own borders and limitations.  I always wanted to be flowing across the world [0:15:07] Philippine and Hong Kong and Singapore and Malaysia and [0:15:12] the US, you know, you never know how big you can get if you don’t remove those obstacles for yourself.

 

KEVIN:

Hmmm.. and Sam..

 

SAM:

It probably sounds like I’m talking about my ego there.

 

KEVIN:

Ha, ha!

 

SAM:

Let me tell you..ha, ha.  Just stand back if you are in your living room there, my ego is in your living room right now!

 

KEVIN:

Ha, ha step one, remove your obstacles, it’s removing your ego, ha, ha.  Step two..

 

SAM:

[0:15:35] removing your ego.  It’s actually, it’s not even about that.  It’s removing other people’s expectation of what you can achieve because I believe that when we are raised, we have our parents’ expectations; when we go to school, we have our teacher’s and education system’s expectation; when we go to work, we have our boss’s and our pseudo boss’s expectation and everybody else, our whole lives, put these expectations of how we should behave, what we can achieve, what we specifically doing at any given moment.  True freedom is breaking free of all of that and being your true self.  And for me being my true self is doing comedy, making people laugh, but also its travel.  I have got this huge passion for travel and language and culture and so if I get an opportunity to go and travel and be in another part of the world and learn a language or taste the food or have an experience, then that’s what I wanna do and it’s not about what other people expect you to doing.  It’s about, this is actually true to myself.

 

KEVIN:

And in being true to yourself, I wanna touch on that because I know a number of your shows I have been to see very much cover that topic of how people interact around the world, I mean, we talk about racism, you know, but you talk about embracism.  So tell us a little bit more about that concept and that philosophy and how you think we should may be approach the world in relation to that?

 

SAM:

Great, well, thank you.  So, yeah, in my own point of view, I am Australian.  I lived in Bali and Malaysia for 5 years.  I learned Indonesian and Balinese.  I have lived in Paris and learned French.  I have lived in England and learned English, you know, not quite the way it’s supposed to be spoken like this, but more like [0:16:59] when you are in Australia [0:17:02] England and not speak English, but very important to learn from other cultures, but your point about embracism is this –  Everybody, if you were born into another country or another family or speaking another language, you would actually think and act and behave like a person from that language or culture etc., right?  So you Kevin, being from Bristol, England, were you born in Ghana or were you born in India or were you were born in Brazil, you know, you might be speaking Portuguese, you might be Roman Catholic, you might be, born in India, you might be, you know, a Hindu or whatever and you may speak Hindi or another one of the Indian languages.  So our perspective on ourselves is based on where we were born, how we were brought up.  These things are lot of [0:17:48] and can be changed.  Now whether you wanna change them or not is your prerogative; however, anyone of us can learn a language, anyone of us can live in another country or most of us can live in another country and learn from those other cultures, but the point of embracism is actually breaking down your ego, breaking down your [0:18:05] identity and absorbing, adapting and learning from other cultures and not only just other cultures, but other ways of thinking, so a [0:18:16] person may get to learn from [0:18:18] you know, someone who’s a white collar worker may be able to learn from the blue collar workers by actually putting themselves in that place and learning what it is, you know, makes them tick.  So it’s about putting [0:18:29] or putting the other shoe, whichever one, however you wanna dressed, it’s up to you.  It’s about learning from other.  So racism is actually about fear of difference and embracism is about embracing difference and my personal belief is the more you embrace the difference, the greater you become.

 

KEVIN:

Hmmm… and you are clearly great, Sam because you embrace your ability with different languages, different cultures, it’s always very inspiring to me.  Now I would like to ask about on the show is about the habits and rituals that people have.  I wanna get a little bit more specific with you on that because we hear again and again you need to exercise, you need to drink water and we are hearing a bit of a passion here with these things, I wanna hear more about your habits of creating comedy and finding things funny because we can all go for life day by day and we can get caught up with the same thing or what’s mundane or you know the things that we don’t enjoy, we don’t focus on that, but you somehow seem to go through life and find what’s funny in it, find something that’s gonna make people laugh.  Is there something that you could share with us from your habits that allows you to do that?

 

SAM:

Yeah, I think that’s an interesting one.  I mean, if you are in a creative space, whether you’re a comedian or writer or an actor or somebody who produces something creatively, some write etc.  You know there are people that sit down every morning and write 2 hours worth of junks and there are a lot of people who never do that.  I am not a habitual writer.  What I do allow myself to do is [0:19:50] space to create.  So inspiration comes to you at any moment, any time.  The habit I have got into, which [0:19:57] was to actually record those creative ideas.  So whether it’s a voice recorder or [0:20:03] or whatever, technology has become so prevalent that we have no excuse not to record our best ideas.  So to me now, I actually will, you know, when I come up with an idea, whether it’s a TV show idea or a book idea or it’s a comedy piece, whatever, I will write it down or I record it on my phone, so it’s always with me and when I come back to it, when I need to create something, I go back to those notes and see what’s relevant.  On the other side of things, I am a deep believer in deadlines [0:20:31] but I find it, deadline can produce so much more in a shortest space of time, now whether it’s some external deadline [0:20:39] or your own deadline, I think it’s very important to have those kind of habits that work into a deadline because you can actually really produce so much in such a short space of time and that shows me that, in fact, I can write a whole show in a month, imagine what I can in 12 months, I could do 12 shows, right?  So whereas if I had 12 months to do it, I would do one show.  So that sort of things is about productivity, you know, give yourself deadlines, allow yourself space to create, making sure you record, quality things that comes to your mind, yeah, I guess the other thing is when I perform putting myself in a state, yeah, in a mental state where I am giving the best for the audience, so I am not bringing with me the baggage of the day and issues I had with the other people, I am coming to perform and stay there to laugh and to hopefully learn something as well, but to laugh and have a good time, so I need to get myself in a state to deliver that experience for them and which means that I go through some little personal rituals to get myself in for that.

 

KEVIN:

And in terms of being creative, are there some tips around creating that space to allow your creativity?  Do you need to do that in isolation?  Do you do that with other people?  Is there some ritual or methodology in how to run that that we could learn?

 

SAM:

Yeah, I am a big believer in collaboration for creativity, specially I find the [0:21:53] thing of the people.  You know, it’s a compound [0:21:57] but other people will trigger you in a certain way which will take it to a angle or level that you wouldn’t otherwise find on your own [0:22:04] I am a big believer in speaking things out loud; it’s a different thing than a thought in your head and to write it down or then speak it to someone.  So if you can combine those, that’s great.  But yeah, I’m definitely a believer in working with others, collaborating and then finding the time to go and fine tune that on your own.  That’s a different story, but I’m able to do them both, but I definitely find a lot of value in collaborating.

 

KEVIN:

Is there something that you have been really proud to have accomplished or something that you would still like to achieve or accomplish?

 

SAM:

Yeah, I heard about this.  Achieving or accomplishing in the future, it’s always important to have things you are looking forward to, goals [0:22:39] wrote a play last year __ play and perform that, which is a great accomplishment for me to actually to do that beside my own stand-up comedy show that I did at the opera house was something on the bucket list, Sydney Opera House that I wanted to achieve and now that’s twice, so I feel like there’s always something [0:22:57] it’s getting a television show up and running, which I believe I can do in the next couple of years and then possibly down the track is writing a film and [0:23:07] actually performing in that.  In terms of actually bucket list, I ticked up a lot of things on my bucket list, I mean, climbing Machu Picchu last year was one of them, going to the Rio Olympics was one of them, climbing the great pyramid of Egypt was one of them that I achieved when I was 24.  There’s a lot of things that I have done in my life that I look back and go, I am so, you know, proud of the fact that when it came to a moment of making a decision whether to do something or not that I chose to do it and so those things in particular, the Egypt, climbing the pyramid of Giza was one, in year 2000 and I was a young man and I had to decide, is this too risky, you know, it’s not a legal thing to do, I should say, but however, I managed to climb up high up there and it was one of the most exhilarating things in my life to actually, you know, top of the great pyramid [0:23:53] 1 a.m. in the morning and that experience, I think, shifted my thinking into what’s possible if you open up your mind and connect with people and take risks.

 

KEVIN:

There you go.  So, I love that, take the risk and climb to the top of your pyramid, whatever that would be.  And Sam, if there was just one book you would recommend for our listeners to read, what would that book be?

 

SAM:

The Bible, the Koran, the Bhagavad Geeta, but if that’s too heavy for you guys, fine.  There is a book that I have never read [0:24:22] the audio is coming up, ha, ha.  There’s a book that I was asked, was told to read when I was a young man growing through in high school and we were all asked to read a book called, Jonathan Livingston’s ‘Seagull’, which I am sure must be heard of, must be read, very short, very thin, probably take you less than an hour to read, but what I told you was about, you know, the gull who flies high as he [0:24:44] so the person who achieves greater heights has more perspective and I think that’s a really inspirational thought to not be part of the flock amongst them that come and sea gulls do, [0:24:54] not routine and going about the business because that’s what a sea gull is expected to do, but actually to [0:24:58] thing, get better at it, and achieve higher and I think that kind of look back, I may have read that book 20 years ago and haven’t read it since, but the concept just stuck with me and I see that what I am doing today is very much along the point of view of being different, not being amongst the flock, practising your skills, getting better at it, getting to another level, having more perspective then reaching another level.  I think if you’ve got an hour, you can read it and it will really impact your life, you know, and I think the other one is ‘Who Moved My Cheese’ by Kenneth Blanchard, is it? I like short books, Kevin.  I don’t like to read for days on end.  I like 1-hour books that pack a lot of impact and that one about, you know, people having expectations of what they ought, what they deserve, you know, and when things are taken away from them, how do they react, how do they behave, and do they go looking for more cheese or more opportunities and I think that book is well, very poignant and can really teach you a lot about the life and accepting what’s coming, moving on and looking for a bigger and better because I believe it’s always something bigger and better out there waiting for you if you are willing to get out and look for it.

 

KEVIN:

Really great show.  Now, Sam, you have been such great fun tonight and you have imparted some really amazing wisdom too.  If our listeners wanted to connect with you and know more about you, book you, where would they come?

 

SAM:

Well, that’s a good question, right?  Come and meet me in my house, that’s [0:26:15] but if you don’t wanna come all this way, send at sammccool.com, so it’s a double m, double c, double o, l.com.  That’s probably the easiest way.  I also have a travel business [0:26:28] so it’s comedy __ travel, my acute passion is comedy and travel [0:26:33] combine them, very happy about that and very happy to talk to people about any of those ideas.

 

KEVIN:

Sam, you have been absolutely fantastic.  We really appreciated having you on the show.  Thank you so much.

 

SAM:

Know as you are welcome and if you wanna go through Kevin, you can, he’ll just charge you a commission I am sure or something like that.

 

KEVIN:

Ha, ha!

 

Thanks so much for listening to the life-changing questions podcast with your host, Kevin Bees.  We’ll catch you next time.

 

Hey, you are on bonus time right now on the life-changing questions podcast and I’ve got three bonuses that I would like to share with you and I call them the three S’s.  The first ‘S’ is for Show Notes; don’t forget you can get all of the details of the show including the names of the books that were mentioned, the key people that were mentioned on kevinbees.com.  The second ‘S’ is Subscribe.  Make sure you subscribe to the show.  We’re going to be releasing a new episode every single week and our guests are just getting better and better. And I’ve got the third ‘S’, Share it; your friends, family, colleagues, loved ones are really gonna appreciate it when you share such great content with them.  That’s it from me and make sure you are asking life-changing questions this week.

 

 

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