Chris Lonsdale

Episode (63) – How to create excellence for yourself and others


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Chris Lonsdale is the founder and Chairman of Third Ear Publishing, and the creator of the world’s first completely integrated mobile learning solution for second language acquisition – Kungfu English. Chris has experience in working with many large organizations including Cola’s Olympic projects for the Beijing 2008 Olympics alongside with the Hong Kong Tourism Board, Standard Chartered Bank, etc.

On today’s show,

Chris shares tips on how to learn a second language quickly but also talks about the importance of creating excellence for yourself and others.

Chris also covers,

  • How he decided to create an app that helps people learn their second language easily
  • Why he thinks that anyone can learn a second language in 6 months
  • Tips for learning a new language: treating it as a tool (relevance), allowing your subconscious mind to engage (brain soak), training your ear, and feedback loop
  • What is a ‘language parent’ and why you need one when learning a new language
  • Language is about transmitting meaning from one person to another, and we clarify meaning as part of communication
  • What is immersion all about and how it actually works
  • His Life Changing Question is: ‘What is truly possible for a completely fulfilled life of excellence?’
  • The importance of putting an effort to identify what else is possible for us and not settling down for what we have right now
  • How finding his barriers and setting a new standard helped his father recover from dementia
  • In the process of creating excellence for others, you are going to discover new possibilities for yourself
  • Why you should get out of your own perspective and think about how things are for the other people
  • His daily ritual is getting into the details around all things
  • Thing on his bucket list is to ride a faster than light space vehicle to the edges of the universe

 

Tweets

Chris Lonsdale is sharing his Life Changing Question. You can listen here Click To Tweet Want to learn a second language but don't think it's possible? Chris Lonsdale knows how Click To Tweet How to create excellence for yourself and other? Chris Lonsdale shares his tips Click To Tweet

 

Resources Mentioned in this show:

TEDx Talk ‘How to learn a language in 6 months’

www.kungfuenglish.com

chrislonsdale.com

Chris Lonsdale

 

Recommended Reading:

Transcription

If just one question could immediately transform the quality of your life or the results of your business, would you want to know what that question was?  Life and business strategist, Kevin Bees, interviews success masters to discover their life-changing questions.  Welcome to the Life-Changing Questions podcast.

 

KEVIN:

So welcome to Episode No. 63 of the Life-Changing Questions podcast.  On today’s show, we have Chris Lonsdale.  Chris is the founder and chairman of The Third Ear publishing, the creator of the world’s first completely integrated mobile learning solution for second language acquisition.  This solution, Kungfu English, is currently sold as an iphone App, ____ No. 4 top-grossing iphone App and the No. 1 top-grossing educational App in China [0:00:47] store.  Chris has experience of working with many large organizations including the likes of helping Cola’s Olympic projects for the Beijing 2008 Olympics alongside with the Hong Kong Tourism Board, Standard Chartered Bank.  I am very excited to welcome to the show today, Chris.  Chris, welcome to the show!

 

CHRIS:

Thanks, Kevin.  Good to be with you.

 

KEVIN:

Chris, you first came to my attention and I think we spoke a few years ago after I watched your show at TED Talk.  It was a very powerful TED Talk.  It gave me a lot to think about and something I am certainly looking forward to sharing a bit more with our listeners today.  Chris, I wonder if you could give us a little bit about your background – where you live, what you do and how you ended up creating such an amazing App, that’s having a big impact on helping people communicate more flexibly.

 

CHRIS:

Well, a very eclectic pathway.  I started out in the southern hemisphere in New Zealand, went to China in 1981, just after China opens, and after a few years in China, my visa ran out, so I basically [0:01:47] in Hong Kong, managed to get a job, worked for a few years and then started my own consulting company, which I ran for a while, still have the company.  So two or three decades now and during that process, ended up in the North Pole for a while, on the Icewalk expedition, did expeditions to India, did a lot of work around environmental protection and in 2006, started on the process of creating Kungfu English.

 

KEVIN:

You said the word ‘eclectic’, I think I certainly agree with you, there’s a lot of variety in what you have been doing there.

 

CHRIS:

Indeed.

 

KEVIN:

Now you mentioned the idea of Third Ear publishing and certainly your book is also called ‘The Third Ear’.  You can learn any language.  So I know your App is very much featured around that.  Tell us a little bit about your passion for that.  Where that has come from and how you are helping people learn any language?

 

CHRIS:

Okay.  My passion for it comes from my experience, which told me and demonstrated to me that learning a second language is actually not very difficult.  It requires some time; it requires some work, but there are so many people who struggle with it so much and you know, I would get into conversations with people where they would say, oh, you are talented, you know, you are a genius, you speak Chinese.  And it was nothing like that.  It was, I made a decision that I wanted to be speaking Chinese as well as a native and I spent a lot of time meeting with people, talking to people and I lucked into some of the methods that are actually natural for learning a language the same as a child learns a mother tongue and as a result of that in about 6 months I went from being a complete beginner in Chinese to being able to get around competently in the language, still [0:03:29], not perfect by any means, but definitely at the level of you know, a 6- or 7- or maybe 8-year-old, after which you know, it was just a matter of building language.  So I lucked into that.  I have studied psycholinguistics in University as well.  I had an issue with [0:03:43] theory, which said, you know, after a certain age you can’t learn a second language, I felt which is rubbish and wrote a paper at the time to say so and so, you know, I was just tired of this conversation [0:03:54] possible, I worked so hard, I just decided to write ‘The Third Ear’ to address that and I decided to write it using hypnotic language patterns in written form to see if it could actually help people change their beliefs, which it did, and a whole lot of people started writing back, they got the book, and they took the book, went to another country, used the ideas in it.  You know, one girl from Australia went to Brazil.  A girl from India went to Chile.  And they went from complete beginner to fluent in Spanish and Portuguese to the point where they could get jobs as a sales manager or as head of diversity in multinational companies in those countries, all based on the fact, they became essentially bilingual.  So I went from there and I met my current partner and decided we should also create a product around these ideas and that was the genesis of Kungfu English.

 

KEVIN:

Which is incredible, when you think about that – to learn a language in 6 months.  So ___ would certainly blow a lot of people’s beliefs as to whether that’s entirely possible or not.  So if you were to maybe give us some of the key fundamentals, like your tips or techniques, is there something that our listeners could start to apply straight away?

 

CHRIS:

Yeah, well, I guess they should watch my TEDx Talk ‘How to learn a language in 6 months’, but the key idea first of all is, you have to treat languages [0:05:13], not a subject of study, you have to use it to communicate even if it’s just a few words, that’s really key.  It has to be relevant for you, so you have to be working with things that are meaningful to you.  To be talking to someone who interests you, is gonna be much, much more powerful than trying to study something in a classroom.  To be, if you are interested in mechanics, to be talking to a mechanic or reading materials about mechanics to build something that you wanna build using a language that you are learning, is going to be much more powerful than trying to study newspaper articles that has no relevance to you.  So that itself really, really key piece.  So getting the relevance piece right, treating it as a tool – those are really fundamental and primary and then you have to allow your subconscious mind to engage, you do things like brain soaking, where you just listen to the language a lot and at a physiological level, you actually train your ears.  So many people trying to learn a language start with books and they overlay the ___ about how it should sound based on the written system from their own language and that’s just a complete disaster.  You actually have to not read initially and just listen to the point where all the sound is really clear and then look at how letters or symbols are used to represent the sounds that you already know.  So there’s a lot of physiological training in it.  Pronunciation is very physiological.  You actually have to create a feedback loop between your ear and your mouth, so you can hear how it feels and you feel how it sounds.  When someone’s talking, it’s almost like you can feel the sounds in your own mouth.  So you need to do little things like that and understand it’s a physiological process, understand that in many ways it’s a subconscious process and arrange your learning around those ideas.  And then, you know, for real communication, you need to get yourself a language parent or somebody who’s interested in you as a person and who will communicate with you and who will not correct you all the time.  People don’t understand what this means, but really it is the correction comes in the form of clarification of meaning.  So like a parent to a child.  The child does ‘Mama, ba’ and the parent says, ‘You wanna bath?’ ‘Ya, mama, ba.’  Okay, so parent just clarified how it should be said by clarifying meaning, but the child doesn’t feel criticized or challenged in any way, but also gets to see, hear the model of what they should be saying.  So that is the sort of the idea.  So there’s a core idea there and then there is sort of the consequences of what those ideas in terms of practical things that you can do.  So and that was why I wrote ‘The Third Ear’ as well, so these ideas were very clear for people and they could actually apply them in their own life and learning.

 

KEVIN:

And I think there is some wonderful tips in there and also we can apply them to successfully learn a language, I’m guessing these tips are probably relevant for us in learning other things as well.  You said make sure you are doing things that are relevant for you, brain soak, take yourself in and around the environment of the thing you want to learn, and feedback loop..

 

CHRIS:

Exactly!

 

KEVIN:

Feedback loop is so key, I mean, you said between what you hear and what you feel, but I am guessing in that any endeavour of learning, you wanna have a feedback loop, like what you are doing well and how you can improve.  I love that final distinction.  So it’s not about correcting, it’s about clarifying meaning.

 

CHRIS:

Yeah, exactly.  Exactly.  Language is about transmitting meaning from one person to another and we clarify meaning as part of communication any way.  And that’s all that’s needed.  Then as a learner, you just need to be sensitive to form in the clarifications.  I mean, someone’s clarifying, you go, oh, so okay, so that’s how they say.  Okay, got it.  And you maybe forget it.  And you forget it three, four, five times until you remember it and that doesn’t matter. [laughs]

 

KEVIN:

Yeah, okay, because this is about improving on what you have already, keep building on that.

 

CHRIS:

Exactly.  Exactly.

 

KEVIN:

I think it’s great that you have given us some examples of people who have managed to go and study and, or not study, you said, use as a tool, over 6 months and become fluent and I think the key thing I am hearing here is that there needs to be a bit of an immersion, you know, you can’t presume that you are gonna go and learn Mandarin or Cantonese if you keep living in an English-speaking country and you only have English speakers around you.

 

CHRIS:

Okay.  I think people misunderstand immersion, in the sense, there’s so many people who have immersed themselves in another country and failed to learn the language.  Because essentially as you are learning any language, you are a baby.  You are literally an infant.  And if you just immerse with the local people who are adults, it really doesn’t work very well because [0:09:35] they are talking about their past history, you know, what happened at school, they are talking about movie stars and politicians in their environment and you don’t have any [0:09:43] and immersion per se is a bit of a problem.  What you need, you can do it.  Essentially you need about 80% of your time to import, so you are listening, you are mapping meaning, you are working with your pronunciation, you are doing all of those things to build up your foundation, you are training your ear, you can do all of that using a system like Kungfu English, for instance, where [0:10:08] for instance and then you work with the language parent, who is gonna interact with you on your level and help you improve [0:10:15] you could do that over the internet [0:10:16] you can talk to a person that you wanna talk to in the language that you are learning pretty much anywhere in the world now __ is roughly about 20% output where you are working with what you have been learning and 80% input in where you are really training your brain to hear everything and you are focusing your attention on understanding meanings, so very quickly you get to reading, listening to content that is interesting and relevant to you and that’s in the language you are learning, but your attention is focused on the meaning rather than on the form of the language as essentially again most of your focus is on the meaning and a little bit on the form, but what happens if you do that is that you unconsciously start picking up the patterns.  So you don’t have to, sort of, get on the plane and go and immerse in another culture.  If you do, you still have to go through this basic process of inputting a lot.  You know, pronunciation, you really should be doing on your own, listening to your own voice, listening to recordings of yourself, comparing with models because you are not going to get that in the country you go to.  You know, an adult is not going to sit there and work with you for 25 minutes showing you how to move your mouth, you actually just have to watch a video overnight of speaking, you know, sort of front end like a child looking at their parents face, how do they say that, and then practicing and listening to your own sound and modifying it yourself.  So you can do all of that work by yourself and then you start talking to a language parent to a point where you are comfortable and confident with some basic level interactions and then you can go out into society and get around.  So as soon as you are at the point you can get around at a basic level, yeah, absolutely going and immersing makes a lot of sense, but a lot of people make the mistake of try and do that from day 1 and after about 4 weeks, they know nothing and they freak out and they give up, which is actually not the way you should do it as an adult.  You need a little bit of entry and runway before you go do that.

 

KEVIN:

That makes a heap of sense to me.  Now Chris, I know that you referred to your TED Talk, and if you are listening and you haven’t seen that yet, check out the page notes for Chris on kevinbees.com/podcast and a link for that TED Talk will be there.  I think, Chris, I recall that’s had over 10 million plus views worldwide.  So it’s a very popular talk.

 

CHRIS:

Last time I looked it was 11 million on YouTube alone.  It’s probably had another 10 million in [0:12:34] channels.  So I don’t know, could be up around 20 million by now.

 

KEVIN:

Yeah, wow.  Chances are that if you have seen it and if you haven’t, it’s certainly worth for watching and listening to, and the thing that really caught my attention on there was even how you started and you asked the question, how to question your mind for so long that it becomes part of how you think?  Now I thought that was really a powerful question.  I know that’s led you.  There was a question that you were asking.  The topic of the show is around life-changing questions.  We say that the quality of the questions we ask ourselves impacts the quality of the life that we lead.  With that being true, Chris, I wonder if you could share with us – what’s one question that you have asked that’s had the biggest possible impact on your life or the life of the people that you serve?

 

CHRIS:

Okay.  I guess the form of the question that I used in the TED talk, which is ‘How can you speed up learning’ and I have been passionate about learning for many, many decades.  So now how do you do it faster, how do you do it better?  But that comes from actually a slightly deeper and wider question, which is really, ‘What is truly possible for a completely fulfilled life of excellence?’ and so it was driven from a sense from a young age that there is more to us than we have ever really realized and we, very seldom get to the boundaries of what is truly possible for us.  So how to speed up learning was really one of the entry points for me into that deeper question.

 

KEVIN:

And that was ‘What is truly possible for a life of …’

 

CHRIS:

A fulfilled life of excellence.

 

 

 

KEVIN:

Okay.  So ‘What is truly possible for fulfilled life of excellence?’  Now when you have asked yourself that question, what’s come up for you?  How has that shifted your life, how has that changed life, how has that made an impact on you?

 

CHRIS:

First of all it goes, okay, what we are doing now is not the end.  Clearly.  What is more?  What more can we do here?  What more can we try here?  How can we do things in a different way?  Yeah, and that could be anything.  It could be around ones diet.  It can be around the exercise regime [0:14:34] around the talks that one finds or makes to do things in a better way, it could be seeking out [0:14:43] performance that people haven’t.  So what is it that they know, how do they think, how do they emote, what are the models that they have and have learned from those.  So sort of an endless journey of discovering of what might be possible.  Let me give you an example.  Few years ago, my dad turned 80 and at the time he got diagnosed as having a light onset of epilepsy, which didn’t make sense to me.  And a couple of years later, he was basically in dementia, couldn’t find his way around his small house, had no muscle strength.  I thought of looking at the meds they had him on and most of his symptoms seemed to be coming from the meds he was on.  So I chatted with him and held him when he went cold turkey on the meds and then he started.  We got him doing brain training exercises.  He started doing some basic yoga, things like the 5 Rites, started using [0:15:35] type techniques to clear old emotional stuff and started doing PACE, which is Progressively Accelerating Cardiopulmonary Exertion.  So short interval, high intensity training.  Today he is 87.  He does a 50-km bike ride every week.  He does intense interval training every day, got his own website, and selling health-related products.  So yeah, with from basically one foot on the grave and another on the banana skin too, somebody who’s vital and [0:16:05] 60 years old or even better, he re-qualified for his driver’s licence when he was 84, after it being cancelled.

 

KEVIN:

It sounds like he is in better condition than I am, Chris. [laughs]

 

CHRIS:

Yeah, so you know that question is, what is possible if you really look at what’s going on and challenge all of our assumptions, it’s pretty much, life is delightful because there are very few barriers.  I won’t say there are no barriers, but to actually find those barriers we have to do a lot more work than most of us in our lazy ways of being are willing to do.  But I think magic in this life is possible.

 

KEVIN:

And I think that’s a really great example and must be wonderful for you knowing that your father is now in a position where he can do these things and have a quality of life whereas before you or maybe other people could have accepted, well, that’s his lot and that’s it for him now.

 

CHRIS:

Exactly.

 

 

KEVIN:

So I think the key message coming through is, we don’t potentially need to settle for what we have right now.  We could be looking it, how do we identify what else is possible for us so that we can fulfil a life that is of excellence.

 

CHRIS:

Yeah, yeah, absolutely.  You just don’t settle, why settle.  Why would we ever settle, yeah!

 

KEVIN:

Really what comes out of that question for me then is almost a message of, there is another standard, [0:17:24] there is another level, so even if you are living a great quality of life now, what else is possible for you?  What else would really be helping you fulfil a life of excellence and maybe if you got everything you need and everything is happening for you, maybe it’s an opportunity to create excellence for others too.

 

CHRIS:

Exactly and in that process of creating excellence for others, you are gonna discover new possibilities for yourself.  You are gonna discover little dark corners in your own consciousness that needs a light thrown on them and that will challenge you again to look at what might be possible, another level for yourself, I don’t think it ends.

 

KEVIN:

No, I think its something that could continually go because I guess as soon as you reach what you think is excellence now, then there’s a new level, there’s a new possibility.

 

CHRIS:

Exactly.

 

KEVIN:

As a recap then, definitely ask yourself that question ‘What is truly possible for you to fulfil a life of excellence?’ and I guess that comes down to your definition of excellence.  What is excellent for you?  What would be excellent for you?  If you are age 80, maybe you need to be setting a new standard because we have got an 87-year-old, now who’s out-cycling, out-running and out-thinking many people of my age!  So I think that’s just pretty impressive.

 

CHRIS:

[Laughs] Indeed.  In that he is an inspiration for me because it’s like, okay, definitely got to keep up with the old man [laughs].

 

KEVIN:

Yeah, yeah, I would say so.  If he’s setting a standard for excellence for you, that’s really, really great.  And Chris, I know that we have mentioned the 20-plus million views of your TED talk and the fact that your Apps have been ranked No. 1 and No. 4.  So, we would love to hear from you a little bit about the habits and rituals that you have.  Clearly you are talking about this question around excellence and you delivering that with what you are passionate and what you are talking about and the products and services you are putting out there.  If there was some habits and rituals that you have, that have allowed you to have this kind of success, what would they be?  Is it something you can share with us?

 

CHRIS:

Oh, okay.  First of all, in interacting with people in relationships, thinking about products, all that sort of stuff, I have another question, which is – what is it like from their perspective?  You know the old saying, never criticize somebody until you have walked a mile in their shoes, so it’s really that.  It’s a getting out of your own perspective and thinking about how things are for other people that you are working with, you are communicating with, and then why are they saying and behaving the way they are.  Because when you actually drill into it, if you were in their shoes, you would very likely be doing exactly the same thing they are doing.  And that then opens up the next stage, okay, so if I wanted to get out of that state myself, what would I need to do and that then helps create a bridge to communicate to mutually support.  Beyond that I always say to myself, there is a way out of this.  Doesn’t matter how bad it looks, there’s got to be a way.  We can create a path through this.  You know, how do I find it?  Beyond that I do a lot of daily planning.  So everyday I would spend 10 to 15 minutes looking at the day, thinking about what is my big picture, what am I trying to achieve here, prioritizing things and spending my energy and time that they only on the ones, the most high priority things that are most likely to move me forward, on the projects and the capacities that I want to be building.  I have a commitment to deepen communication with people which goes way beyond the daily rituals of [0:20:53] and nobody really communicated anything.  I think it’s important to really get into the details around things.  So much information gets lost by generalizations and speech and writing and communication.  I think you actually need to drill into what does that really mean and what is the operational process underlying what is being communicated here and through that I can understand a lot, about mechanics of lots of things.  I mean, when you understand these mechanics, you can actually start working with them and changing them and around that to be very, very specific.  So those are some habits of mine that I have applied rigorously now for many decades.

 

KEVIN:

Really great habits and rituals and so as a recap, don’t be surface level in terms of asking, how are you and then not really hearing the answer.  Get into detail.  Understand what’s happening for people and that can really help build deeper relationships.  I like the idea of the daily planning as well, making sure that you take that time to prioritize.  What are the key things if you are prioritizing every day, what’s the items that are gonna have the biggest impact on your life, take it towards your goals, your level of excellence and you focus on those and that’s gonna help get you to your outcomes and your results and how you can live that life of excellence or even more.  And you said four words in the middle of there Chris, which I think is super powerful.  And it’s a very powerful belief that I am sure has led you to the success you have, which is – there is a way.  There is a way.  So no matter what you are facing, no matter what the challenge is, if you know there’s an outcome that you want, you can find out there is a way.  I think it’s a prime example of what you have been to accomplish with your father even when he was very, very unwell.  You helped him find a way through that, so now he’s living a quality of life that many people of his age wouldn’t be.  And of course, one final piece as well, I really love that question, you know, what is it like from their perspective?  So understanding what’s going on for someone else like actually you can physically do that, step out of where you are sitting, [0:22:48] standing in their shoes or looking through their eyes and I think they can give you a big understanding of what’s going on for them and will allow you that level of empathy, will allow you to make a better connection with them and hey, maybe even help you communicate more effectively and you said something really cool around, you know, you shouldn’t criticize someone until you’ve walked a mile in their shoes.  Now, I remember Billy Connolly, the Scottish comedian talking about this.  He said, you should never judge anyone or never criticise anyone until you have walked a mile in their shoes.  And he said, hey, once you have walked a mile in their shoes, do what the hell you like, he said, say what the hell you like because you are a mile away from them and you’ve got their shoes.

 

CHRIS:

[Laughs] and only Billy Connolly can do that, aye.

 

KEVIN:

Ah there you go.  Billy, welcome to the show today.

 

CHRIS:

Great, he’s is a great guy, great guy.  I like his humour a lot.

 

KEVIN:

[Laughs] you can do a great accent there, Chris.  That’s fantastic.  And Chris, we would also love to hear from you around your bucket list.  You have achieved so many great things in your life.  Is there one thing that you have been most proud to achieve so far or one thing that really stands on your list, is there something that you still look forward to going to ___ achieve or do?

 

CHRIS:

I would love to ride a faster than light space vehicle to the edges of the universe.

 

KEVIN:

That would be cool.  If you get one of those, then let me know, I’ll hitchhike with you.

 

CHRIS:

indeed, indeed and for that to happen, we need to extend life so we can see, be and do more during that whole process so that then creates a whole new field of exploration for you know, there is a way, how do we do it?

 

KEVIN:

There is a way, how do we do it?  And that comes back to that belief as well.  I think that’ll be super cool.  I know there’s a lot of work happening with human longevity to help us live longer and I know that peace is happening and just hopefully they’ll build a spacecraft quick enough so we’ll have the experience.  I would certainly be up for that.

 

CHRIS:

The key, the key here is, if we can live longer, we better learn to live wiser.

 

KEVIN:

Ah, yes [laughs].  If we are going to live longer, not just wiser, we are gonna learn to live with a high level of excellence.

 

CHRIS:

Indeed, so wiser, high level of excellence.  I like footprints and sort of moving gracefully through the world and through the universe doing as little harm as possible.

 

KEVIN:

Yep, very important message and Chris, once our listeners have read your book, ‘The Third Ear, You Can Learn Any Language’.  If there was one book that you would recommend for them to read, what would that book be?

 

CHRIS:

Okay.  I would say there are really too many things and too many really good people in the world with fantastic knowledge and perspectives to decide just one book.  Yeah, that’s sort of a [0:25:33], can I say three?

 

KEVIN:

Go ahead.

 

CHRIS:

One is ‘The Biology of Belief: Unleashing the Power of Consciousness, Matter & Miracles’ by Bruce Lipton.  A different one is called ‘The Biology of Transcendence’ by Joseph Chilton Pearce.  Both are very, very interesting in terms of human neurology and the influence in how we think and how we believe has even on our physiology and on our extra capacities that most people are unaware they have.  So those two are really, really key.  I think the third one is one that I read back in the early 80s, ‘The Tao of Physics’ by Fritjof Capra, which for me was actually a seminal book because at the time I was really struggling, the difference between Chinese, Asian – their philosophy,  beliefs and the western culture philosophy and beliefs and so the struggling around you know, which is the right one, until I came to the conclusion that none of them are right, all of them were simply descriptions that were partial and ‘The Tao of Physics’ really looks at how, what we are learning and what we had already learned by that stage in modern physics ____ and those disciplines maps really, really well to some of the mystical traditions that have come down through the ages.  So yeah, what we learn from physics today and what we have come to us from mystical traditions are actually different perspectives on the same underlying reality and that is both challenging and freeing.  So I think those are sort of some really interesting leverage points to challenge us in terms of getting out of the daily mundane reality into what is possible again.

 

KEVIN:

I love it.  It’s not any of those books that we have recommended on the show before and you cover such a wide range there from belief right way through to physics. Certainly going to be something that I maybe looking forward to, to grabbing and reading.  So, Chris you have been so gracious with your time today.  You have really given us a lot of great insight and of course a very powerful and life-changing question there.  If our listeners want to contact you or experience your App or make a connection some way, how would they do that?  What’s the best place for them to go to?

 

Chris:

Hmm.. what’s the best place for them to go to?  Yes, if they can read Chinese, they could go to www.kungfuenglish.com.  Or they could at my website chrislonsdale.com, which is unfortunately unmaintained at this time.  I am spending all my time on Kungfu English, but people could find a connection point there.  You can find me on LinkedIn as well, just look for Chris Lonsdale on LinkedIn.

 

KEVIN:

Chris, thank you so much for your time and your energy today.  We really appreciated having you on the show.

 

CHRIS:

Kevin, thank you.  And thank you for your great questions.

 

Thanks so much for listening to the life-changing questions podcast with your host, Kevin Bees.  We’ll catch you next time.

 

Hey, you are on bonus time right now on the life-changing questions podcast and I’ve got three bonuses that I would like to share with you and I call them the three S’s.  The first ‘S’ is for Show Notes; don’t forget you can get all of the details of the show including the names of the books that were mentioned, the key people that were mentioned on kevinbees.com.  The second ‘S’ is Subscribe.  Make sure you subscribe to the show.  We’re going to be releasing a new episode every single week and our guests are just getting better and better. And I’ve got the third ‘S’, Share it; your friends, family, colleagues, loved ones are really gonna appreciate it when you share such great content with them.  That’s it from me and make sure you are asking life-changing questions this week.

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